Does higher education still prepare young people for jobs? Additionally, employers like Google, Amazon, and Microsoft, have highlighted the importance of learnability — being curious and having a hungry mind — as a key indicator of career potential. Featuring Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, Chief Talent Scientist at Manpower Group, co-founder of Deeper Signals and Metaprofiling, and Professor of Business Psychology at University College London and Columbia University. All rights reserved. We often hear employers and business leaders lament the unfortunate gap between what students learn in college and what they are actually expected to know in order to be job-ready. Find your passion. Although there is a clear premium on education — recent reports from The Economist suggest that the ROI of a college degree has never been higher for young people — the value added from a college degree decreases as the number of graduates increases. Recruiters and employers are unlikely to be impressed by candidates unless they can demonstrate a certain degree of people-skills. More and more students are spending more and more money on higher education, and their main goal is largely pragmatic: to boost their employability and be a valuable contributor to the economy. Often, the strongest individual contributors are promoted into management, even though they haven’t developed the skills needed to lead a team. Does Higher Education Still Prepare People for Jobs? Most employers say there is a gap between what students learn in college and what they need to know on the job. Academic grades are indicative of how much a candidate has studied, but their performance on an intelligence test reflects their actual ability to learn, reason, and think logically. In a recent ManpowerGroup survey of 2,000 employers, over 50% of organizations listed problem-solving, collaboration, customer service, and communication as the most valued skills. python, analytics, cloud computing). We often hear employers and business leaders lament the unfortunate gap between what students learn in college and what they are actually expected to know in order to be job-ready. (Published in Harvard Business Review 14 January 2019), Manavale | 454 Collins Street | Melbourne | 3000 | 03 9108 4234, resilience, organisational development, high performing teams, leadership, health & wellbeing, Leadership, High Performing Teams, above 40% of 25 to 34-year-olds in OECD countries, and nearly 50% of 25 to 34-year-olds in America, the strongest individual contributors are promoted into management. Are the college graduates you hire job-ready? On October 22, in an interactive Harvard Business Review webinar, Chamorro-Premuzic will examine the shortcomings of the traditional higher education system in preparing graduates for today’s jobs. May 10, 2020 - Many degrees don’t teach students the skills they’ll need in the future. Harvard Business Publishing is an affiliate of Harvard Business School. We often hear employers and business leaders lament the unfortunate gap between what students learn in college and what they are actually expected to know in order to be job-ready. When employers attach value to university qualifications, it’s often because they see them as a reliable indicator of a candidate’s intellectual competence. So, while tertiary degrees may still lead to higher-paying jobs, the same employers handing out these jobs are hurting themselves — and young people — by limiting their candidate pool to college graduates. In short, we believe that market demands clearly call for a paradigm change. There are several data-driven arguments that question the actual, rather than the perceived, value of a college degree. Featuring Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic , Chief Talent Scientist at Manpower Group, co-founder of Deeper Signals and Metaprofiling, and Professor of Business Psychology at University College London and Columbia University. Becky Frankiewicz is President of ManpowerGroup North America and a labor market expert. Even if the value attached to a university degree is beneficial to those who obtain it, companies can help change the narrative by putting less weight on “higher education” as a measure of intellectual competence and job potential, and instead, approach hiring with more open-mindedness. If we were to pick between a candidate with a college degree and a candidate with a higher intelligence score, we could expect the latter to outperform the former in most jobs, particularly when those jobs require constant thinking and learning.

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